Liggins Institute


The Liggins Institute was the University’s first large-scale research institute. Our vision is 'a healthy start for a healthy life' and our mission is to improve life-long health through excellent research into the long-term consequences of early life events.

Research themes

Our goal is to turn research discoveries into real strategies that will help people to prevent and manage major health problems in the 21st century and our four key research themes focus on achieving this.

How to get involved

Attend a public lecture, take part in a clinical trial or make a donation. There are lots of ways to get involved and help improve health outcomes at every age and stage.

Future postgraduates

Choose from a wide range of postgraduate degrees and research projects to kick-start your career in biomedical research, or cultivate new skills that will complement your clinical practice.

  • How nutrition in early life affects adult bone health
    30 August 2017
    We have all heard that a high-fat diet raises your risk for heart disease and metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in adulthood. Now new research shows it also compromises your bone health, especially if you were born small or early, or if your mother had poor nutrition during pregnancy.
  • Dairy intolerance real - “not in people’s heads”
    14 August 2017
    For the first time, scientists have shown that dairy intolerance is a physiological condition distinct from lactose intolerance, and not “all in people’s heads”.
  • Low blood sugars in newborns linked to later difficulties
    08 August 2017
    A newborn condition affecting one in six babies has been linked to impairment in some high-level brain functions that shows up by age 4.5 years.
  • Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring
    18 July 2017
    Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.
  • Research update on Multiple Sclerosis
    17 July 2017
    Dr Scott Graham, expert in neuroinflammation, and co-investigators Dr Jennifer Pereira; ADHB’s leading MS neurologist, and Dr Simon O’Carroll; Director of the Spinal Cord Injury Research Facility (SCIRF), are investigating an unknown soluble substance that appears to have an effect on the permeability of the brain in patients with MS.